Oklahoma State and the Stick/Slant concept

It’s up over at the Grantland blog:

Oklahoma State has excelled for both of the past two years with “packaging concepts,” and in this case, putting different “coverage beating” pass concepts to each side of the field. Doing this gives quarterback Brandon Weeden options on where he wants to go with the ball, depending on the pass coverage. On this play, the Cowboys lined up with three receivers to the left and Blackmon, as the split end and the running back, the versatile Joseph Randle, to the right. The pass concept to the three-receiver side was a staple of Oklahoma State’s offense: the stick concept. On stick, an outside receiver runs a vertical route, an inside receiver runs to the flat while a third receiver runs a “stick” route, essentially just hooking up at five or six yards. This creates a stretch on the defense in the form of a triangle, and is good against almost all zone coverages and some man-to-man looks.

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Read the whole thing.

  • Deaux68

    What coverage did Stanford end up in here? I ask because this is one reason that Weeden and company have been successful in my opinion. When offense start going really fast the defenses start getting lazy and don’t disguise quite as well.

    This looks like zero to me and it’s pretty obvious. Now they may have spun the safety over the #3 receiver to the deep middle and played some sort of 1 hi or zone blitz, but right now there are several QBs in the game that can make this read.

  • Anonymous

    It looks like obviously zero to me, except one interior guy for Stanford does try to drop back. But I agree, especially in their quick game Oklahoma State does a great job just looking for leverage. If it’s not zero that’s how OKST ends up treating it and burning them as a result of bad disguising.

  • Anonymous

    It looks like obviously zero to me, except one interior guy for Stanford does try to drop back. But I agree, especially in their quick game Oklahoma State does a great job just looking for leverage. If it’s not zero that’s how OKST ends up treating it and burning them as a result of bad disguising.

  • 4.0 Point Stance

    Notice how #44 Chase Thomas faked a blitz step to try to screw with the blocking reads then tried to drop into middle coverage. Problem is, because of that step forwards that he only ended up getting in a zone about 3 yards deep when the ball was released, and against these routes he didn’t have anyone to cover. No way is he catching Blackmon from behind. Maybe Stanford expected a shallow cross. Still a weird call; Stanford’s DBs just don’t have the DNA (especially at the nickle/dime level) to matchup with OSU’s receivers in cover zero.

  • http://twitter.com/CBrown_18 Christian e Brown

    Somehow I knew you were going to write up on this after your tweet last night.  Great stuff Chris! 

  • Ionlywatchkickersongamewinners

    Off topic, but related to ok st/stanford. Did anyone see the ok st kicker move pre snap on the game winner? Then, the michigan kicker moved pre snap on his game winner. It was pointed out on the broadcast. Why is this not a bigger deal than it should be? Both kickers very clearly false started. I only ask here because of the clientele chris attracts. Please tell me I’m not the only one who noticed & thinks the opposing coaches should’ve been raising hell.

  • DoubleB

    I think Stanford ran something similar on defense on Weeden’s Q Draw on the goalline. Players were pressed at the line and then were dropping off as Weeden found a way to score.
    And while Stanford got beat here defensively, I think overall they had a nice plan for their talent level: completely shut down the run and force long-yardage situations. OSU was only 4 of 12 on 3rd downs.

    I’m also a little surprised Stanford was so tired on that last drive. OSU only ran 54 plays in regulation.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/MrMurder-Murphy/802155723 Mr.Murder Murphy

    Blackmon’s alignment is key, he is a great X type of player, able to work free one on one with leverage. People are off the ball too much to be a full blitz, pretty poor disguise effort by the middle defender as you note. Thought the Cardinal had B team talent level on the interior of that D all year and disguised things to make up for it.

    A quick snap usually catches someone out of position when people freelance a bit too much. The attempt to confuse protection was not fitting the coverage technique.

    There was another play he did the quick in, like an option look off the Smash concept, but the back was #2 and widened out to hold the corner. Scorched them, this is the same play? The call for that was supposed to be a sight hot, think it was something they plan into Blackmon’s side on most calls if he is singled out there. Gives you most talented player extra room to work free when he sees it develop. There is an NFP article on Blackmon vs. Stanford going right now.