Smart Football Round-Up 9/2/2015

In connection with the start of the season (and the new book), I’ve been doing some Q&As and podcasts. Below are some links:

  • Solid Verbal Podcast: Talking defense and the start of the college football season with Dan Rubenstein.
  • RotoViz Radio: A fun discussion with Josh Norris and Matthew Freedman about trends in the NFL, quarterback reads and progressions and the potential of some young receivers.
  • AndtheValleyShook Q&A: Q&A with Billy Gomila on LSU’s new defense, pro-style versus spread and college football trends.
  • The Oklahoman Q&A: A Q&A with Jason Kersey regarding the Big 12, Oklahoma, and the Air Raid offense Lincoln Riley is bringing to Norman.

New Grantland: Breakdown of Gary Patterson’s TCU 4-2-5 Defense

I’ve been working for a few months on a deep-dive analysis of Gary Patterson’s morphing, multifarious 4-2-5 defense for Grantland, and it’s now up. Patterson’s defense is intriguing on a number of levels, and not only because TCU is ranked #2 in the preseason AP polls: Patterson’s 4-2-5 is custom built for the kinds of wide-open, uptempo spread offenses that now dominate football at every level, but there’s a lot of nuance into exactly why that is:

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Patterson’s 4-2-5, however, was designed with those challenges in mind. By playing five defensive backs, Patterson almost never needs to substitute to match up with the offense. But the system’s genius runs even deeper: Patterson has cleaved the very structure of his defense into pieces, simultaneously making everything simpler for his players and more complicated for opponents.

“We divide our defense into attack groups,” Patterson explained at a coaching clinic in 2011. Those attack groups are: (1) the four defensive linemen and two linebackers, referred to as the front, (2) one cornerback, the free safety, and the strong safety, and (3) the weak safety and other corner. For most teams, the calls for the front and secondary only work if appropriately paired, but that’s not the case for TCU. “Our fronts and coverages have nothing to do with each other,” Patterson said at the clinic. “The coverage part is separate from the front.”

Read the whole thing.

Amazon drops Kindle price of The Art of Smart Football to 99 cents

Amazon has dropped the price of the Kindle edition of my new book, The Art of Smart Football, to 99 cents.

My old book, The Essential Smart Football, is also only 99 cents right now. Note that you can read Kindle books on non-Kindle devices by downloading the free Kindle app for your computer or for iOS or Android.

The Smart Football Glossary

Football is bathed in jargon. Other sports have their wonky terms but anyone who even casually watches a football game is bombarded with a cascade of code words, while even experienced fans usually can’t make heads or tails of what coaches and players say to each other on the sidelines. Some of this is inherent in a game made up of a few seconds of action interrupted by breaks for communication. And the phenomenon of platooning — where offensive players don’t play defense and vice versa — creates additional opportunities for coaches and players to communicate, and, like any other pressure filled profession, from the armed forces to medicine, communication in these circumstances is condensed so that the most information is conveyed in the fewest syllables.

wordcloud1All too often, however, discussing even the most rudimentary and fundamental football concepts is needlessly offputting, something exacerbated as too many announcers and analysts use streams of buzzwords to sound intelligent without actually conveying any information (something I try very hard to not do, though undoubtedly with inconsistent success). Unless you’re sitting on an NFL sideline trying to tell your position coach what the defense is doing, you are better off using as little jargon as possible and instead trying to explain what you see in English.

But in football, terminology is often destiny, and some terms have become so ingrained that being familiar with them is critical for any intelligent fan; on the other hand, others have become so misused that using them actually deters rather than enhances understanding. The goal of this football glossary is simply to unpack a limited set of football buzzwords in a way that will make watching games on Saturday and Sunday more enjoyable. The important thing, however, is not to focus on the terms but instead on the explanations: if we’re all on the same page with those, the names we given the underlying ideas — whether you call it Smash, China or Shakes — what we end up calling it is simply detail, not substance. I’m sure your high school coach had his own name for each of these below.

Arm Talent: A notorious bit of scout-speak that is either a pseudo-scientific way to describe something obvious (“That quarterback has a strong, accurate arm”) or an extremely clumsy way to describe something better served with colloqiual english (“He has the ability to throw the ball from different angles to avoid oncoming rushers and still find an open throwing lane through which he can deliver the football”).

Bang 8 Post: A particular version of the “skinny post” or “glance” routes, the “Bang 8” or “Bang 8 Post” was developed by former San Diego Chargers head coach Don Coryell and calls for the receiver to run seven-steps straight downfield before breaking inside at an angle. The particular angle the receiver takes, however, depends on the leverage of the defender covering him: the receiver’s job is to take whatever angle is necessary to ensure he is between the quarterback and the nearest defender. (“8” is the number for a post in the Coryell route tree, see “Route Tree” below.) “Bang” indicates that the route is not thrown as a deep bomb but instead is a rhythm throw thrown by the quarterback on rhythm as soon as he hit the fifth step in his dropback. Troy Aikman and Michael Irvin of the Cowboys ran the Bang 8 better than anyone in NFL history:

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Audio Round-up — The Art of Smart Football

I’ve spent the last few days doing a few selected podcasts and radio hits (and there’s more to come). They were all fun; links are below.

It also looks like Amazon has dropped the price on the paperback copy of The Art of Smart Football to $8.99 and the Kindle edition to $6.99.

The Art of Smart Football is Now Available on Kindle

The Art of Smart Football, my new book, is now available for Kindle.

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The Art of Smart Football

You can read more about the book here, and you can also check it out in paperback. And if you get the book and enjoy it, I’d truly appreciate it if you wouldn’t mind spending a brief minute to write a review on Amazon. It would be much appreciated.

Mastering the Sack

I recently stumbled across some pretty nifty cut-up videos of NFL sacks, which highlight the effort, techniques and schemes that result in losses for offenses. It’s an understudied area, as sacks and pressures that move the QB off the spot and force bad throws or decisions are often seen as results rather than processes: it happened or didn’t, but how and why remains hidden. And it’s hidden because (1) it’s an extremely technical, delicate ballet of footwork, leverage and hand placement and (2) it’s also a total melee in there.

This excellent post from Shakinthesouthland lays out some of the basic pass rush moves, and most others you may see are just variations of these:

There are several we’re going to cover here but all start with the proper stance, with weight over their feet and not the down hand, and correct alignment. The initial step is always important. Every man has a pass rush lane that he shouldn’t deviate from until he has to do so. Every man must constantly be moving his feet and his hands, no matter what. Every pass rusher will start with one or two in high school and progress from there, and some in the NFL may only use 3 or 4 different techniques with variants off of those. Here I’ll cover the basic pass rush techniques

  • Bull Rush
  • Speed Rush
  • Swim
  • Grab
  • Rip/Inside
  • Spin
  • Under
  • Counter/Club

Of course, the beauty of these moves is that, over the course of a game, a defensive lineman or even a rush linebacker can vary and set up moves for down the line: the bull rush works when the offensive lineman isn’t expecting it after dealing with a steady dose of speed rushes; the rip inside and the spin work well against a lineman who is well coached to handle the speed or bull rush; and so on.

And understanding these moves helps us in appreciating the really special players. J.J. Watt breaks countless “rules” in the moves he uses because he studies, because he plays psychology versus his opponents and because, well, he can:

When [Wade] Phillips first saw Watt try the maneuver, 35 years of NFL practices set off alarms in his head. “The first time you see it, you think about the old coaching adage, ‘You never go around the block,’” Phillips says. “Well, you do when you can make the play.” Coaches refer to these plays as calculated risks, and what Phillips and defensive line coach Bill Kollar soon realized is that Watt’s were more calculated than most. Because Watt watches so much film, he has an ironclad grasp on what plays to expect out of formations. Because he was quicker, he could recover faster. Because he has the best hands in the league, he could shed blockers more easily.

Here is a link to a PDF analyzing J.J. Watt’s moves, and here is Ben Muth on stopping pass rush moves from an offensive lineman’s perspective. After the jump are a few more video clips on pass rush techniques.

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My New Book: The Art of Smart Football

My second book, The Art of Smart Football, is now available. Like my first book, The Art of Smart Football is a collection of chapters across a range of subjects, all dealing in with football strategy and tactics, as well as the people behind them. I truly hope you enjoy it.

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If you’ve read every word I’ve ever written (I should be so lucky!) you will recognize some subjects that aren’t all-new. But there’s new material and I’ve also edited and updated each chapter to now, and in most cases expanded the chapters as well.

I chose to publish the book myself, as I did with The Essential Smart Football, for a variety of reasons. I nevertheless have had a great deal of help along the way, in particular from my readers who have provided tremendous support and feedback at every step.

You can purchase the book using the links below. I’ve also included a special 20% discount code for my smartfootball.com readers. I hope that is a small token of my appreciation for your support over the years; this August will mark the ten year anniversary of Smart Football.

A final, small request: If you get the book and enjoy it, I’d truly appreciate it if you wouldn’t mind spending a brief minute to write a review on Amazon. It would be much appreciated.

For any marketing or other inquiries, please email me at chris [at] smartfootball.com

Smart Notes: Chan Gailey, Matching Markets, Russell Wilson’s Contract, Marcus Lattimore, Sleep, 7/9/2015

Fascinating discussion of why we (i.e., most everyone in the modern world) can’t fall asleep.

– Bill Barnwell on Russell Wilson’s contract and the year the NFL gave the MVP award to a kicker.

Former South Carolina runningback Marcus Lattimore says his NFL career was “hell… every day.

Is Chan Gailey a quarterback whisperer? I like Chan and he’s a good coach, but “QB whisperer” seems a bit much. Probably a better fit for the Jets than they’ve had recently, however.

– I really enjoyed this GQ article on the infamous Magic City club of Atlanta.

Alvin Roth on the EconTalk podcast discussing “Matching Markets,” or markets that require the buyer and seller to select each other. This interesting applications for free agency and recruiting.

James Light on Gunter Brewer’s passing concepts. James has had a lot of good stuff recently.

Doug Farrar on whether any runningback could excel behind Dallas’s line.

I enjoyed this bit of game theory:

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Matt Hinton on the dark side of conference realignment and Holly Anderson on rattlesnake rodeos.

Matt Levine on whether you can really game index funds.

– Make sure to sign up for the Smart Football email list (there will only be emails when there’s news, like a new article). Also be sure to “Like” Smart Football on Facebook.

That’s how you block the second level

Tulane’s graduate assistant offensive line coach Matt Jones posted some great clips of NFL offensive linemen doing their thing recently, with this one maybe being my favorite:

These weren’t too bad either, though: